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Tsunami

WHAT TO DO BEFORE AND DURING A TSUNAMI

The following are guidelines for what you should do if a tsunami is likely in your area:

  • Turn on your radio to learn if there is a tsunami warning if an earthquake occurs and you are in a coastal area.
  • Move inland to higher ground immediately and stay there.
  • Stay away from the beach. Never go down to the beach to watch a tsunami come in. If you can see the wave you are too close to escape it.
  • CAUTION - If there is noticeable recession in water away from the shoreline this is nature's tsunami warning and it should be heeded. You should move away immediately.

WHAT TO DO AFTER A TSUNAMI

  • Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio, Coast Guard emergency frequency station or other reliable source for emergency information. The tsunami may have damaged roads, bridges or other places that may be unsafe.
  • Help injured or trapped persons. Give first aid where appropriate. Call for help. Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of further injury.
  • Help a neighbor who may require special assistance—infants, elderly people and people with disabilities. Elderly people and people with disabilities may require additional assistance. People who care for them or who have large families may need additional assistance in emergency situations.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls. Telephone lines are frequently overwhelmed in disaster situations. They need to be clear for emergency calls to get through.
  • Stay out of the building if waters remain around it. Tsunami waters, like flood waters, can undermine foundations, causing buildings to sink, floors to crack or walls to collapse.
  • When re-entering buildings or homes, use extreme caution. Tsunami-driven flood waters may have damaged buildings where you least expect it. Carefully watch every step you take.
    • Wear sturdy shoes. The most common injury following a disaster is cut feet.
    • Use battery-powered lanterns or flashlights when examining buildings. Battery-powered lighting is the safest and easiest, preventing fire hazard for the user, occupants and building.
    • Examine walls, floors, doors, staircases and windows to make sure that the building is not in danger of collapsing.
    • Inspect foundations for cracks or other damage. Cracks and damage to a foundation can render a building uninhabitable.
    • Look for fire hazards. There may be broken or leaking gas lines, flooded electrical circuits, or submerged furnaces or electrical appliances. Flammable or explosive materials may come from upstream. Fire is the most frequent hazard following floods.
    • Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas using the outside main valve if you can, and call the gas company from a neighbor's home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
    • Look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell burning insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first for advice. Electrical equipment should be checked and dried before being returned to service.
    • Check for sewage and water line damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap. You can obtain safe water from undamaged water heaters or by melting ice cubes.
    • Use tap water if local health officials advise it is safe.
    • Watch out for animals, especially poisonous snakes, that may have come into buildings with the water. Use a stick to poke through debris. Tsunami flood waters flush snakes and animals out of their homes.
    • Watch for loose plaster, drywall and ceilings that could fall.
    • Take pictures of the damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance claims.
  • Open the windows and doors to help dry the building.
  • Shovel mud while it is still moist to give walls and floors an opportunity to dry.
  • Check food supplies. Any food that has come in contact with flood waters may be contaminated and should be thrown out.
 

2016 Calendar

JANUARY

FEBRUARY
California Chapter NENA: Mission Critical

MARCH
FCC CSRIC Quarterly
National Flood Safety Awareness Week
National Poison Prevention Week

APRIL
Tim Brown Mentor Mini Camp for Fatherless Boys
California Statewide Legislative 9-1-1 Heroes Awards
City of San Francisco 9-1-1 Heroes Awards

National Dispatcher Appreciation Week
National 911 Education Month
Navigators Conference
National Earthquake and Tsunami Awareness Month
National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

MAY
22nd annual Tim Brown 9-1-1 for Kids Celebrity Golf Classic
Motorcycle Safety Month
National Bike Month
National Hurricane Preparedness Week
National Safe Boating Week

JUNE
NENA National Conference
National Sheriffs Assn. Conference
FCC CSRIC Quarterly
National Safety Month
National Fireworks Safety Month
Home Safety Month
National CPR & AED Awareness Week
Sun Safety Week

JULY
National Fireworks Safety Month

AUGUST
IAFC
APCO International
National Night Out
National Safe at Home Week

SEPTEMBER
National Preparedness Month
FCC CSRIC Quarterly

OCTOBER
IACP
Red Ribbon Rally
National Fire Prevention Week
National Crime Prevention Week
National Teen Driver Safety Week
Great California Shake Out

NOVEMBER
National Teens Don’t Text and Drive Week

DECEMBER
Kathy Ireland Holiday Children’s Celebration
FCC CSRIC Quarterly

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•  9-1-1 for Kids® • Address: 14340 Bolsa Chica Road, Unit C, Westminster, CA 92683 •
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